Tag Archives: listening

The Art of Listening

The Art of Listening: Cultivating Emotional Intelligence Through Intuition and a Quiet Mind

In the fast-paced world we live in, where information constantly bombards us from all directions, the skill of listening has never been more crucial.

True listening goes beyond simply hearing words; it involves engaging with others on a deeper level, tapping into our intuition, and quietening the mind to foster emotional intelligence.

The Power of Intuition in Listening

Intuition, often regarded as our “gut feeling,” plays a significant role in effective listening. It’s that subtle sense that guides us beyond the surface of words and allows us to connect with the emotions and intentions behind them.

Intuitive listening involves being attuned to non-verbal cues, such as body language and tone of voice, which can convey more than words alone.

To harness the power of intuition, we must be present in the moment. This means putting aside distractions, silencing the inner chatter, and truly focusing on the person speaking.

When we open ourselves to intuition, we gain valuable insights into the speaker’s emotions, making it easier to respond empathetically.

Quietening the Mind for Deeper Connection

In a world filled with constant noise, both external and internal, cultivating the skill of quietening the mind is essential for meaningful conversations.

Our minds are often racing with thoughts about our own experiences, judgments, and responses, which can hinder our ability to listen effectively.

Practicing mindfulness techniques, such as meditation, can help quiet the mind and create a mental space conducive to active listening.

When we approach a conversation with a calm and open mind, we become more receptive to the speaker’s words and emotions.

This not only enhances our understanding but also fosters a deeper connection with the person sharing their thoughts.

Listening with Emotional Intelligence

Emotional intelligence involves recognizing and understanding our emotions and the emotions of others in the moment.

When applied to listening, emotional intelligence allows us to navigate conversations with empathy, compassion, and a genuine desire to connect.

By combining intuition and a quiet mind, we can enhance our emotional intelligence in listening. This means not only hearing the words spoken but also interpreting the emotions underlying them.

When we respond with empathy and understanding, we create a safe space for open communication, fostering stronger relationships and mutual respect.

 

Better Conversations workshopsIn conclusion, the art of listening is a multifaceted skill that requires intuition, a quiet mind, and emotional intelligence.

By embracing these elements, we can build deeper connections with those around us, fostering a culture of understanding and empathy in our fast-paced world.

So, let’s make a conscious effort to not just hear but truly listen, and in doing so, we can contribute to a more compassionate and connected society.

Feel like you want to improve your conversations by becoming a better listener? Workshops and 1:1 coaching sessions are available.

Revisiting old books

With several bookshelves full to capacity, it makes sense as we start the winter months to spend some time revisiting old books. When I mention old books, yes – some are very old and were printed in the 1800’s, others are from the 20th century and just a few are from this century. There is an eclectic mixture of classics, novels, poetry, self help and spiritual books interspersed with textbooks that cover Asian history and religions, homeopathy and teaching texts. Just a few remain unread, waiting for the right time to deliver the information within.

Revisiting old books today, I was looking for some inspiration for a workshop and I rediscovered M.Scott Peck’s¬† The Road Less Traveled.¬† I often open a book to a random spot and find inspiration from that page.

So, for today’s inspiration (which would have been useful for a workshop), I discovered the following quote:

“By far the most common and important way in which we exercise our attention is by listening. We spend an enormous amount of time listening¬† most of which we waste, because on the whole most of us listen very poorly. “